Strengthening integration movement is Community’s New Year resolution

first_img CARPHA Partners with, PAHO to Ensure Caribbean States’… Oct 15, 2020 Barbados releases new COVID-19 Travel Protocols Oct 16, 2020 Oct 16, 2020 Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC St Kitts/Nevis Preparing to host Inter-Sessional Meeting of CARICOM HeadsBasseterre, St. Kitts, January 11, 2019 (SKNIS): St. Kitts and Nevis is busy preparing to host the 30th Inter-Sessional Meeting of the Conference of Heads of Government of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), which takes place from 26-27th February 2019, at the St. Kitts Marriott Resort and Royal Beach Casino. A…January 14, 2019In “CARICOM”St. Kitts and Nevis Government providing humanitarian aid to The BahamasBASSETERRE, St. Kitts, September 17, 2019 (Press Unit in the Office of the Prime Minister) – Prime Minister Dr. the Honourable Timothy Harris announced during this morning’s (Tuesday, September 17) sitting of the National Assembly that the Government of St. Kitts and Nevis has approved financial aid to the Commonwealth…September 17, 2019In “CDEMA”PM Harris: St. Kitts and Nevis will support The Bahamas, HaitiBASSETERRE, ST. KITTS  (PRESS SEC)  — Prime Minister Dr. the Honourable Timothy Harris has pledged approximately EC$1 million to Haiti and the Bahamas, as the two countries work to rebuild and recover in the wake of Hurricane Matthew. Prime Minister Harris’ weekend announcement came after the Cabinet of Ministers received…November 22, 2016In “CARICOM”Share this on WhatsApp CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak You may be interested in… Oct 16, 2020 Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… last_img read more

Opening Ceremony – Media Advisory

first_img Apr 15, 2020 An Opening Ceremony for the Thirty-Eighth CARICOM Heads of Government meeting will be held on Tuesday 4 July 2017 from 5:00 p.m. at the Grenada Trade Centre, St. Georges. Accredited media representatives are invited to cover this ceremony.  The proceedings will also be streamed Live on the CARICOM Face Book page –   https://www.facebook.com/caricom.org/ and the CARICOM News Blog, CARICOM Today – http://today.caricom.org/ The Opening Ceremony will be addressed by: Press Release re: Ninth Special Emergency Meeting of the… CARICOM Heads: Addressing trade and economic issues… You may be interested in… Feb 19, 2020 Jul 5, 2019center_img Promote citizen security to shore up CARICOM’s… CARICOM has role to play in Venezuela situation says PM… Jul 4, 2019 Incoming CARICOM Chairman, Prime Minister Dr. Keith Mitchell of GrenadaOutgoing CARICOM Chairman, President David Granger of GuyanaNew Prime Minister of The Bahamas, Dr. Hubert MinnisNew President of Haiti, Mr. Jovenel MoiseCARICOM Secretary-General Ambassador Irwin LaRocque Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Grand Anse and beyondToday, we continue to place the spotlight on Grenada ahead of the Thirty-Eighth Meeting of the Conference of Heads of Government of CARICOM. We flash back through Grenada’s milestones as a champion of closer integration among the territories of the Region. The Regular Meeting of CARICOM Heads of Government will…July 4, 2017In “Antigua & Barbuda”Follow the Opening Session – 29th CARICOM Inter-Sessional – Monday morningCARICOM Chairman, President Jovenel Moise of Haiti will address the Opening Session of the 29th Inter-sessional Meeting of CARICOM Heads of Government at the Marriott Hotel, Port-au-Prince, on Monday 26 February at 9:00 a.m. (10:00 a.m. ECT). Immediate-past Chairman, Prime Minister Dr. Keith Mitchell of Grenada and CARICOM Secretary-General Ambassador…February 25, 2018In “General”WICB, CARICOM agree on way forward for cricketCARICOM Chairman and Prime Minister of The Bahamas, the Rt. Hon. Perry G. Christie (centre), Prime Minister of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Dr. Ralph Gonsalves to his left; Dr. Hon. Keith Mitchell, the host Prime Minister and CARICOM sub-committee chairman for Cricket (right), the Hon. Gaston Browne, Prime Minister…April 22, 2015In “Antigua & Barbuda”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

National Drug Observatories critical to fight against drugs in CARICOM

first_imgThe critical importance of Drug Observatories (DOs) was underscored at the Opening of the Regional Seminar for Drug Observatories in the Caribbean on 4 April, 2018, at the Radisson Georgetown Princess Hotel, Guyana. The significance of international cooperation and synergies in the fight against illicit drugs was emphasised also to the gathering mainly of CARICOM practitioners, policy-makers and researchers in the field. Ms. Beverly Reynolds, Coordinator for Health and Human Development, Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat, said Drug Observatories were expected to “provide a more accurate picture of the drugs situation” in a country. “They help to identify emerging trends at an early stage and they provide decision-makers with the evidence needed for designing and evaluating appropriate strategies…”, she said. CARPHA: Leading the Caribbean’s COVID-19 Response – VIDEO Standards, Quality Still Important You may be interested in… Oct 7, 2020 Oct 7, 2020 The minister noted that international cooperation was vital and a basis for working together to ensure that the scourge of drugs was extirpated from our societies. The representative of the Organisation of American States (OAS), Mr. Jean Ricot Dormeus reiterated the case for international cooperation, remarking that the seminar resulted “from a synergy among several entities: the OAS, CARICOM, the European Union and the United States of America”.  Chargé d’Affaires for the United States Embassy in Guyana, Terry Steers-Gonzalez, reiterated his government’s continued support for DOs around the world, noting their important functions to collect monitor, analyse and treat data and to disseminate information to local, regional and international stakeholders to inform decision-making. Mr. Terry Steers-Gonzalez, Chargé d’ Affaires, US Embassy in Guyana, delivers remarks at the opening of the seminar See more photos here “Their roles are vital in the region’s fight against illicit drug use and trafficking and without which our efforts are just a shot in the dark…”, the US representative said. Feature Speaker, Guyana’s Minister for Public Security, Hon. Khemraj Ramjattan, challenged the gathering on the output of the seminar.  “If there is one thing that I would like to see coming out of this seminar is your emphasis on evidence-based data-driven policies and practices”, he said. The Minister likened drug observatories to the “brains of the society”, tasked with coming up with the relevant evidence-based solutions, policies and practices. In order to do so, he noted, Observatories must ask the correct corrections. “The correct questions in relation to matters of drugs sometimes lead us, for example, to whether we should legalise the activity or decriminalise the activity…”, he said. Oct 1, 2020 Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Relations within the Western Hemisphere: an uneasy alliance CARICOM and UNEP extend cooperation on environment “We need to understand more clearly the threats to our societies and economies. We need to sharpen our tools to counter these threats effectively. We need to craft policies that curb crime and violence. We know that the abuse and trafficking of drugs fuel crime and violence, and at the same time destroy our youth, seek to corrupt our civil servants and politicians, and derail the forward movement of our economies… This synergy signals to me that no entity can do it alone; unity does generate force”, he said. Mr. Dormeus commended the newly-established National anti-Narcotics Agency (NANA), for being instrumental in the preparation of the meeting, which he said “shows already great signs of vibrancy”. The two-day seminar is being held in collaboration with the Government of Guyana and the OAS Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (OAS/CICAD). It aims to strengthen the capacity of representatives to gather, analyse and report on drug-related information and to enable the development of evidence-based drug policies and programmes.  It is an activity of the response under the Drug Demand Reduction (DDR) component of the Tenth European Development Fund (EDF) Crime and Security Programme between the European Union and CARIFORUM. Sep 25, 2020 Evidence-based, data-driven policies to address drug situation, other crimes – Khemraj RamjattanThe importance of drug observatories in the fight against the illegal drug situation was reiterated throughout the Opening Ceremony of the Regional Seminar for National Drug Observatories in the Caribbean on 4 April, 2018, at the Ramada Princess Hotel, in Georgetown, Guyana. Speaker after speaker made the case for evidence-based,…April 5, 2018In “CARICOM”Strategic Alliances critical to the fight against drugs in CARIFORUM      A Workshop to strengthen the Dominican Republic’s Drug Treatment Court opened today at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Santo Domingo. The need for a human rights approach in drug prevention strategies, and the critical importance of national and international cooperation and strategic alliances in the fight against…October 22, 2018In “CARICOM Secretariat”Incorporate Human Rights in Prevention, Treatment Strategies to Tackle Drugs in CARIFORUM      Training to strengthen the Dominican Republic Drug Treatment Court Programme began on 22 October, in Santo Domingo, as part of the Caribbean Forum (CARIFORUM)’s strategy to tackle the drug problem from the demand side. The two-day capacity-building initiative is part of the response under the Drug Demand…October 23, 2018In “CARICOM Secretariat”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

Sink or swim? Islands innovate to thrive in a high-stress world

first_img CARIFESTA XV in Antigua and Barbuda postponed to 2022 Oct 1, 2020 “It’s going to be a long and painful process,” Antigua and Barbuda Prime Minister Gaston Browne told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “We just have to rely mostly on our resources, and to find creative ways to generate income to continue the recovery efforts.” In the face of serious and growing threats, experts detect a sea change in many of the world’s 57 small island states and other remote island economies that share development challenges. They are finding innovative alternatives to lurching from one crisis to the next – whether the problem is extreme weather, mass tourism, plastic waste, water shortages or migration. Barbuda, aware it will take time to get back on its feet even as this year’s hurricane season began in June, aims to stay safer in future – like many of its Caribbean neighbors. Brennan Banks, Red Cross operations manager for the Irma response, said the aid agency plans to build a new office on Barbuda that can double up as an emergency shelter. It is also offering free first-aid training to locals and fixing up rainwater-collection systems, while working with the government to improve early warning on the two islands. Such solutions – often developed at least partly with islands themselves – are already improving lives, and protecting communities and environments on a small scale. But their fledging efforts need far more funding to make a difference – and lessons learned in these living laboratories must be shared widely, say officials and resilience experts. SHELTER IN A STORM Hugh Riley, secretary-general of the Caribbean Tourism Organization, believes the region is better prepared for this year’s hurricane season, even if it is still vulnerable. “Every time we have an incident of some kind, we learn from it,” he said. “The whole business of rebuilding stronger has resonated with us, rebuilding better has resonated with us, rebuilding smarter has resonated with us.” Recent improvements include better government coordination, communications systems that work more smoothly, and faster evacuation plans, he said. According to a June report from the World Bank, building back from a disaster stronger, faster and in a way that includes everybody can yield major dividends for small island nations. Doing so would reduce losses in people’s wellbeing by an average 59 percent across a sample of 17 island states, it said, compared with 31 percent for all 149 countries in the study. For Antigua and Barbuda, the reduction would be as large as 78 percent. Co-author Stephane Hallegatte said the benefits of reconstruction that also protects against future disasters are comparatively large for small islands because they face a high level of risk and exposure to storms and other natural threats. Many tend to have low-quality housing unable to resist even moderate hazards, the World Bank economist noted. “There is a lot of potential for improvement,” he said. “There are very cheap opportunities.” Those can be as simple as giving local people who repair their own homes tougher roofing materials, and teaching them how to attach the roof more firmly so it stays on in high winds. When the British Virgin Islands were blasted by Hurricane Irma in September, more than a third of the territory’s 7,000 homes were destroyed or sustained major damage, authorities say. Construction workers have flocked in from all corners of the Caribbean, working marathon shifts to rebuild. But materials – from windows to plywood and galvanized roofing – are only arriving in dribs and drabs from Puerto Rico and the U.S. mainland, with delays of up to three months. The government is working on a new building code tailored to more extreme weather, and has set up a $15-million assistance program to help lagging residents build back. Yet some in the relatively affluent British overseas territory, which has a population of just 32,000, are falling through the cracks. SPONSORED “It’s as if the hurricane happened yesterday,” said 55-year-old government employee Albert Wheatley, surveying the debris of his pink wooden house now overgrown with weeds. “And I don’t know when this will change.” One way to cut long waits for financial help after a disaster is to use social welfare systems to channel cash to recipients, said the World Bank’s Hallegatte. After top-strength Cyclone Winston hit Fiji in February 2016, the government used its three main social assistance programs to deliver top-up payments, equivalent to three months of regular benefit, to help residents recover. But many small island states have “very little” in terms of social welfare, Hallegatte noted. Disasters can trigger the establishment of such schemes, however, and the World Bank is now seeing greater government interest, he said. “If there is one place on Earth where you really want to design your social protection system considering natural disasters … that will be small islands,” he added. Resilience advisor Stewart Sarkozy-Banoczy said helping islands withstand the pressures they face requires a broad view, encompassing everything from nature and culture, to economics and the law. The Island Resilience Initiative he leads is working with Palau, the Marshall Islands and Fiji in the Pacific to track their progress toward the global development goals agreed by the 193 U.N. members in 2015, and decide on priority projects. The aim is to pave the way to an approach “much more angled on resilience and ‘precovery’ rather than constantly talking about recovery” after disasters, said Sarkozy-Banoczy. In the British Virgin Islands resort of Cane Garden Bay, the onslaught of Hurricane Irma made residents realize rapid development to cater for mass tourists disgorged by cruise ships had damaged their natural defenses, putting them in harm’s way. They have since formed a volunteer committee to restore coral reefs, wetlands, mangroves and ponds that trap rainfall running off hillsides, to protect the village from future floods and storms and preserve its natural beauty. “You have to have a balance, or you lose what you love,” said local celebrity Quito Rymer, a reggae singer-songwriter now rebuilding his restaurant and hotel wrecked by the hurricane. “We have decided to take things in our hands.” CLIMATE CHALLENGES Scientists say warmer air and warmer seas around the globe are increasing rainfall and wind speed in storms – and may have intensified the two top-strength hurricanes that battered the Caribbean last year, causing about 235 direct deaths and losses estimated at $130 billion. In its latest flagship report published in 2014, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change pointed to rising sea levels as one of the most widely recognized climate change threats to low-lying coastal areas on islands and atolls. Combined with extreme events like storm surges, it identified “severe sea flood and erosion risks” for islands, with saltwater degrading groundwater supplies. Other risks from hotter seas include increased coral bleaching and reef damage, which could undermine coastal protection, fisheries and tourism, hurting island communities and costing jobs, scientists said in the report. Mindful of those risks, some islands in the Caribbean – the world’s most tourism-dependent region – are looking beyond beach holidays for fresh ways to entice tourists, from music festivals to fertility vacations and sports camps. Kate Brown, executive director of the Global Island Partnership (GLISPA), an alliance spearheaded by island leaders, believes many islanders are painfully aware of climate change and wider environmental threats. In Vanuatu, Palau and the Seychelles, for example, they are already acting to manage the risks – whether by introducing locally managed marine reserves or banning plastic bags and straws, she said. “You can go to a village virtually anywhere, and they understand that climate change is impacting them,” she added. “Heaps of changes are being made … There has been a big shift away from waiting for other people to do things.” PEOPLE AGAINST PLASTIC One area that has seen a “huge push”, said Brown, is action to clean up plastic waste, which is polluting the oceans to the tune of 8 million to 13 million tonnes per year. Eight million tonnes is like covering an area 34 times the size of New York’s Manhattan Island to ankle-depth, according to a study by the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis at the University of California-Santa Barbara. On the Indonesian island of Bali, tour guide Wayan Aksara joined, and later became chairman of Trash Hero Indonesia after getting a growing number of complaints from clients about rubbish on its once-pristine beaches. The community group, which has more than 20 chapters across Indonesia and about 12 on Bali, uses social media to organize weekly garbage collection events for volunteers. “There is a plastic problem in Bali … We need time but we (have) started already,” Aksara told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “Big things start from small things.” On Ibiza, a Balearic island off Spain’s east coast known for its clubbing scene, activists are pooling efforts to raise awareness of the growing plastic problem among its 144,000 residents and 3.25 million annual visitors. Love Ibiza Now, one of about 20 organizations in a “Plastic Free Ibiza” alliance started in late June, is promoting beach cleans, tote bags and biodegradable straws, for instance, and recruiting villa rental agencies, restaurants and top DJs to help sell an eco-friendly approach to tourists. “The thing that makes this do-able is the small size of the island,” said Sarah Drewer, who runs online communications for Love Ibiza Now. “The message has to be really simple and without judgment.” SMART AND SUSTAINABLE To manage scarce resources better and grow their economies cleanly, some islands are turning to smart technology and digital solutions. On drought-prone Mallorca, another of Spain’s four main Balearic islands, the small town of Esporles is experimenting with the “Internet of Things”, installing sensors to monitor water consumption and help detect leaks faster. It plans to extend its antenna-based network to check on air pollution and ease parking problems in busy summer months. “I think the data gives us very valuable information – to analyze it and understand the next steps we need to take,” said the town’s 30-year-old mayor, Maria Ramon Salas. Meanwhile, across Europe’s islands, authorities are aiming to adopt renewable energy technologies to shrink the expense of providing electricity and cut their climate-changing emissions. Energy costs on the continent’s 2,400 inhabited islands are between 100 and 400 percent higher than on the mainland, Christopher Jones, senior energy advisor at the European Commission, told an April conference on “smart islands”. But in the past five years, renewables – from solar plants with battery storage to offshore wind turbines – have become cheaper, and switching to them creates jobs, he added. “Today we have extraordinary opportunities,” he said. “We are at the start of an energy revolution on islands.” The tiny Greek island of Tilos, for example – which suffers regular power cuts – is betting on a new hybrid wind and solar power plant to meet its electricity needs. Until this summer, Tilos got all its electricity from a diesel power plant on the island of Kos, 69 km (43 miles) away – which struggles to meet demand in the peak tourist season. Mayor Maria Kamma hopes Tilos’ Europe-funded push for a self-sustaining clean energy supply will go beyond keeping hotel lights on, and ensure residents “have a very good standard of living”, allowing them to work there all year round, deterring young people from leaving and even enticing newcomers. Experts say a rise in renewable energy provision on islands also could help entrepreneurs like former development worker Joanna Edghill. She and her husband set up an electric car company on the Caribbean island of Barbados five years ago. Their business, called Megapower, has since sold 300 electric vehicles and set up 50 charging stations plus a handful of solar car-ports on the 34 km-long island – and is now expanding in the region. Faced with high fuel import costs, “the Caribbean is ripe for the electrification of transportation”, said Curtis Boodoo, an academic working on the issue with the CARICOM regional group of 15 countries. GROW YOUR OWN Sourcing an adequate supply of food can also send import bills sky-rocketing for islands in the Caribbean and beyond. In many places, residents and visitors get most of their food from shipping containers, said Ian McNeel, who co-founded Slow Food Barbados, which promotes local organic produce and runs school programs to reconnect children with farming. Poor families in Barbados can spend up to three-quarters of their income on food, often buying low-quality imported products that contribute to bad diets driving obesity and diabetes, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). But some Caribbean farmers are working to reverse that trend by reviving traditional crops and sharing their knowledge, said Arno Boersma, manager of the Centre of Excellence for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States. They include award-winning Belmont Estate, a 17th-century plantation on Grenada that produces organic cocoa and spices, and runs farm tours, a restaurant and a museum, he noted. Besides a shortage of home-grown food, many islands also suffer from insufficient drinking water – but the islanders of Kavaratti, capital of the Lakshadweep archipelago, a group of 36 islands in the Arabian Sea off India, are making their own. Once forced to use brackish water as the sea seeped into their limited groundwater supplies, they now have a locally developed desalination plant. “The best part is that we can close our eyes and drink a glass of water without worrying about falling ill,” resident Khadeeja Lavanakkal told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. Buoyed by the project’s success, the Chennai-based National Institute of Ocean Technology set up two more desalination plants on Lakshadweep islands in 2011, and is now building six more, hoping to power them in future with the ocean’s energy. REFUGEES WELCOME? The common wisdom is that as environmental pressures worsen with climate change – making it harder to fish, farm and find clean water – some island populations might be forced to look for a new home. In the Pacific, that has raised ethical questions about whether larger countries like New Zealand should offer humanitarian visas to so-called “climate migrants” – a policy now under consideration. Some low-lying islands, such as Kiribati, have bought land elsewhere with a view to moving whole communities, while Choiseul Province in the Solomon Islands has plans to shift its capital to a safer location. But in other regions, where sea level rise is less of an existential threat, some islands are seeing migrants arrive, not leave – and governments are grappling with how to handle them. Trinidad and Tobago, for example, has received asylum requests from about 3,300 Venezuelans struggling to survive amid a political crisis and harsh recession at home, according to April data from the U.N. refugee agency (UNHCR). Ambulance driver Miguel Vegas, 39, is seeking refugee status for himself and his family. “We just want permission to work. We want to pay taxes,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. The government of the twin-island nation is working on a new asylum system, as lawyers say the current process does not meet international obligations to protect asylum seekers. But the influx of Venezuelans is causing anxiety over whether there are enough jobs and social services to go round. On the Greek island of Tilos, which has welcomed about 30 Syrian refugees fleeing war back home, restaurants and other businesses offer the newcomers work in the tourist season. But there is little employment for the rest of the year. Abdulkader Hamo, a Kurdish refugee who left Syria with his family last summer, says his children are happy on Tilos, where they go to school and are no longer afraid of air strikes. Nonetheless, he is considering moving elsewhere. “There is no work here. It’s not great for a family,” he said. Anastasia Giannakopoulou, a social worker with Greek aid group Solidarity Now, said refugees face the same difficulties as the 550 local residents, “living in a small place”, with some seeking work on other islands in winter. The authorities are committed to creating job openings for everyone, such as a planned cheese factory using milk from island goats that will employ 15 people, including six refugees. “This is a really sustainable and profitable business which can withstand the passing of time, and grow by adding more refugees in future,” said Tilos’ Mayor Kamma. A HAND UP While there is no shortage of solutions to island problems, not all are moving at the same speed, creating a hunger for more knowledge and finance, experts say. “We need to figure out how to give a hand up to those that are going to struggle,” said GLISPA’s Brown. Many island treasuries, especially in the Caribbean, are massively indebted, and lack the cash to build back better after disasters or pursue a more sustainable economic model. Some Caribbean islands are selling citizenship and passports to foreigners for chunky donations or investments. “It’s bringing in an enormous amount of money, and it’s helping us to reduce our debt burden in a very serious way,” said Keith Mitchell, Grenada’s prime minister. After the 2017 hurricanes, Saint Kitts and Nevis offered citizenship for a family of four in return for a $150,000 payment to a relief fund. Those involved say vigorous vetting eliminates applicants with criminal backgrounds, on international watch lists or involved in money laundering. But analysts say security risks remain and tax loopholes are easily exploited. Overall, islands face big hurdles in attracting donor funds and private investment, noted the World Bank’s Hallegatte. Their governments often lack the staff to prepare and sell projects to potential backers. The investment sought is often too small to appeal, and the cost of making deals and doing business is very high due to remote locations, he added. But international development banks can help by working with islands to group diverse resilience projects and market them to investors as green bonds, Hallegatte said. Regional insurance pools are also helping island states get quick cash to kick-start recovery after a disaster – although they have attracted more governments in the Caribbean than the Pacific so far. Under one innovative financing model, eight Caribbean island states have set up national trust funds to protect biodiversity and manage natural resources wisely – and are putting in their own cash to match donor contributions, noted GLISPA’s Brown. Yet despite “exciting” developments, there remains a gap in securing investment on the scale required, she added. “There’s a huge amount of resources needed for islands to get to where they want to be, and also just to become more resilient to all the changes that are going on,” she said. Reporting by Megan Rowling in Barcelona and Mallorca; Sophie Hares in Grenada and Barbados; Sebastien Malo in the British Virgin Islands; Gregory Scruggs in Trinidad and Tobago; Isabelle Gerretsen in Tilos, Greece; Anuradha Nagaraj in Lakshadweep, India; and Michael Taylor in Bali, Indonesia; writing by Megan Rowling; editing by Laurie Goering, Robert Carmichael and Belinda Goldsmith. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, climate; change, resilience, women’s rights, trafficking and property rights. Visit news.trust.org/ Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… BARCELONA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – When the Caribbean island of Barbuda was battered by Hurricane Irma last September, about 90 percent of homes were destroyed or damaged, and the entire population had to be evacuated. Since the school year ended last month, the pace of families returning from neighboring Antigua – where many lodged with relatives or in state-run centers – has picked up, even though reconstruction is unfinished, the Red Cross said. Almost half of Barbuda’s roughly 1,800 people have gone back, as the cash-strapped, twin-island nation works on ways to protect people from future disasters while waiting for promised aid funds to rebuild homes – which could take years. On Caribbean Statistics Day, PM Mitchell Hails Unwavering… Oct 9, 2020 Greater Focus on Regional Agriculture center_img Oct 7, 2020 Oct 15, 2020 You may be interested in… CDF, IRENA Collaborate to Boost Low-Carbon Investments in… How to build back better after a hurricane with the next one a few months awayOP-ED By Irwin LaRocque and Achim Steiner*  Imagine relocating the entire population of your country in the face of a colossal hurricane and two months later still not being able to get back home. Now imagine spending several nights in a shelter and taking a stroll the next morning only…November 17, 2017In “Anguilla”CDB approves US$29M to rehabilitate infrastructure damaged by Hurricane Irma in Antigua and BarbudaDecember 14, 2017, BRIDGETOWN, Barbados – The Board of Directors of the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) has approved US$29M in funding to the Government of Antigua and Barbuda, to assist with recovery efforts after the passage of Hurricane Irma in September. The funds will be used to rehabilitate and reconstruct…December 15, 2017In “Antigua & Barbuda”CARICOM Secretary-General – saddened by deaths from Hurricane IrmaSecretary-General of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), Ambassador Irwin LaRocque has expressed his sadness at the deaths caused by Hurricane Irma in its path through the region. “I am saddened to hear of the loss of life the Secretary-General said.  “I extend my sympathies to the families of the deceased and…September 7, 2017In “Anguilla”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

David Krohn Named President and COO of Engineered Machined Products

first_imgEngineered Machined Products, Inc. (EMP) has appointed David Krohn to serve as president and COO of the company. Previously, this role was held by Brian Larche, founder and principal owner of EMP. Larche will continue to serve as chairman and CEO of the company. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement EMP is a leading developer and producer of engine thermal and oil management systems. Headquartered in Escanaba, Mich., EMP operates manufacturing and assembly centers in Michigan and Indiana, and an R&D technology center for development and testing of conventional and revolutionary proprietary products. Krohn began his career in 1972 with 3M Co.’s executive development program in St. Paul, Minn., where he gained experience in finance, manufacturing and supply chain management. He served in various senior management roles from 1975 to 1990 with J.P. Industries, Clevite Industries, Inc. and Gould Inc. From 1990 to 1998, Krohn worked for T&N Plc. and served as president and CEO of AE Goetze, Inc., an OEM and aftermarket engine parts supplier. With the acquisition of T&N by Federal-Mogul, Krohn was appointed senior vice president of the $2.5 billion brake, chassis, ignition and fuel divisions and the Asia/Pacific region. Krohn then joined Tower Automotive as executive vice president for the $2.2 billion U.S. and Canadian business. Krohn recently has been working with leading private equity companies on M&A and providing industrial management services. For more information about EMP, go to: www.emp-corp.com. _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.last_img read more

Michelin Execs Apparently on Missing Flight

first_imgWith more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement Various news reports say that at least two ­ maybe three – Groupe Michelin executives were aboard an Air France flight that disappeared en route from Brazil to France early this morning.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Dow Jones reports that two executives – the head of Latin American operations and a computing manager for Brazil – were on the Air France Airbus A330 that disappeared over the Atlantic just hours after taking off from Rio de Janeiro. Meanwhile, AFP reported that a third Michelin executive from its corporate offices in France was also on the flight. Officials say that the flight apparently lost all electronics after hitting a sudden, unexpected storm, knocking out its communications and radar devices. Currently, search teams are scouring the Atlantic off the South American coast. (Courtesy of Tire Review),Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business. last_img read more

SALES – TERRITORY SALES MANAGER

first_imgLSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement Candidate must have strong selling skills, understand channel distribution and ability to analyze the market. Required to conduct both technical and economical sales presentations. Knowledge of collision repair and coatings industry desired. Degree preferred. Excellent communication (both oral and written) and interpersonal skills, professional presence and creditability a must. Travel 60%. Competitive starting salary plus incentives and benefit package. EEO/AA employer F/M/D/V. Click the Apply Now button below to upload and send your resume with cover letter directly to the employer. A pop-up window should appear.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement ITW Evercoat, a division of a Fortune 500 Company, and manufacturer of automotive refinishing products seeks sales representative for the territory of MS, LA and TX. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business. center_img With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

Executive Changes at Navistar

first_imgWARRENVILLE, Ill. — Navistar Inc. has announced that Al Saltiel, former president of NC2 Global, LLC, has returned to Navistar, Inc. as chief marketing officer. NC2, is the 50/50 global joint venture between Caterpillar and Navistar, which develops, manufactures and distributes commercial trucks outside North America and India. Prior to his two-year post at NC2, Saltiel had served as vice president, marketing for Navistar. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Phil Christman, Navistar’s president for global truck operations and a member of the NC2 board of directors, has been named as president of NC2 to leverage opportunities in growth markets.   “Phil’s product and industry knowledge and Al’s ability to advance Navistar’s brand strategy make both men well suited for their new roles,” said Daniel Ustian, Navistar’s chairman, president and CEO. “During his time at NC2, Al did an outstanding job of introducing Cat and International products and dealers in key markets. He’ll bring bold ideas to our mission of growing Navistar brands globally. Phil’s extensive experience growing our global business makes him the ideal leader to take our JV with Caterpillar to the next level.” In Saltiel’s new role as chief marketing officer, he will manage Navistar’s marketing resources and will have worldwide responsibility for driving Navistar’s expanding portfolio of brands. Navistar also announced that Jim Spangler has been named chief communications officer and will lead the company’s corporate communications globally. “We are proud to have Jim join the Navistar team and are confident that his proven leadership and experience in our industry will help continue to build Navistar’s reputation in the global marketplace,” said Ustian. Advertisement A 26-year communications veteran, Spangler brings to Navistar a wide range of communications experience. He spent nearly 12 years with Tenneco, where he served as vice president of global communications and was responsible for corporate positioning, communications strategy and policy, executive communications, employee communications, media relations and public relations. Before joining Tenneco, Jim was director of global public relations and media relations for Arthur Andersen. Spangler also spent nearly eight years at Amoco Corp., in roles of increasing responsibility within the company’s public and government affairs group. He began his career as a reporter at City News Bureau of Chicago. Spangler holds a bachelor’s degree in communications from the University of Illinois. He is a member of the Arthur Page Society and the Public Relations Society of America.last_img read more

On The Job In Los Alamos: Paving Library Parking Lot

first_imgOn the job in Los Alamos Wednesday are crews repaving the parking lot at Mesa Public Library. #worklosalamos #wherediscoveriesaremade. Photo Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.comCrews repaving the parking lot Wednesday at Mesa Public Library. Photo Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.comlast_img

Annual Pueblo Independence Day Celebration Aug. 11

first_img“Participating in this run, or supporting a runner, is a way to pay tribute to the Ancestors and show appreciation for the sacrifices they made,” said Marlon Magdalena, ranger at the Jemez Historic Site. “Their brave resistance helped preserve the Pueblo way of life: our culture, our languages and our right to one day reclaim our aboriginal lands.” SANTA FE ― New Mexico Historic Sites is hosting two major commemorative events in August. The run begins at 7 a.m., and the public is welcome to participate. A free light supper will be served (first come first serve) 4-5:30 p.m. green chile cheese brats, a Texas BBQ hot dog, an Italian stylehotdog (bell peppers, onions and a cream sauce), baked beans, chips/salsa, iced tea, coffee with a twist, and fry bread with honey or powdered sugar for dessert. In the 17th century, the Spanish established a Catholic mission at the village. The mission was short-lived, and, in time, the people abandoned the site and moved to the current location of Jemez Pueblo. San José de los Jémez church is unusual for its massive size and rare, octagonal bell tower. Colorful frescos that once decorated the interior walls were revealed during archaeological excavations in 1921 and 1922. The massive stone walls were constructed about the same time the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock. The heritage center contains exhibitions that tell the story of the site through the words of the Jemez people. Ruins of San Jose de Los Jemez Mission, Jemez Historic Site. Courtesy/New Mexico Historic Sites  A short drive from Albuquerque and Santa Fe, Jemez Historic Site is one of the most beautiful prehistoric and historic sites in the Southwest. It includes the stone vestiges of a 700-year-old village and the San José de los Jémez church dating to 1621. The village of Giusewa was built in the narrow San Diego Canyon by the ancestors of the present-day people of Jemez (Walatowa) Pueblo. The name Giusewa refers to the natural springs in the area. Saturday, Aug. 17 Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner hosts Summer Letters from the Reservation, a series of letters and oral histories read in chronological order, to represent the lives of the people on the Bosque Redondo Reservation, as well as the policies employed by the U.S. government toward Navajo and Mescalero Apache people from the summer months of June, July and August 1863 to 1868. NMHS News: At 10 a.m., guest speakers will welcome all the runners and their sponsors to the site. The following festivities, between 10:30 a.m. and 3 p.m., will feature Jemez traditional dances. There will also be authentic Native arts & crafts and Native food. There is no admission fee for any of the activities related to this event.center_img For more information, call Fort Sumner Historic Site at 575.355.2573. A 1,400-foot interpretive trail winds through the impressive site. Supper will be followed by the letter reading until 7 p.m. in the site auditorium. The event and food are free and are sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Later in August, the Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner launches Letters from the Reservation, a series of letters and oral histories on the lives of the people at Bosque Redondo reservation. (*Media resources for both events available.) Commemorative activities will begin with a pilgrimage run from Walatowa plaza in Jemez Pueblo to Giusewa Pueblo kiva at Jemez Historic Site (approximately a half-marathon or 13 miles). The 16th annual Pueblo Independence Day celebration is Sunday, Aug. 11, in the village of Jemez Springs. The event commemorates the events of Aug. 10, 1680, when the Pueblo People of New Mexico and Arizona launched a successful rebellion against Spanish colonization. Members of the public who want to participate in the program may volunteer by contacting the site. Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner. Courtesy/New Mexico Historic Sites  last_img read more