‘Philosophy School of Phish’ Professor Starts Kickstarter To Produce Film

first_imgLast month, we reported that Oregon State University was offering a course entitled Philosophy School of Phish, based around the jam band’s summer tour. Now it seems the professor wants to document the whole experience in a film. To do so, however, she launched a Kickstarter to raise $25,000 towards the goal.You can watch the short video by Dr. Stephanie Jenkins has made regarding the project: Here’s a short note that she wrote as well, justifying the roots of Phish music within philosophical framework:“I’m a phan and philosopher. My greatest teachers have been Foucault, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Phish. Your music and their texts make up the sound track of my life. In his dialogue, Theaetetus, Plato recounts Socrates’ statement that philosophy begins with “wonder.” In my experience, wonder begins at a Phish concert, dancing. Thank you for saving my life and being my muses. For these things, I will never be able to repay you, but I hope to share with others some of the joy you bring me. For my students, this means they get lectures about “Crowd Control,” “Slave to the Traffic Light,” and “Maze.” These are two books that you have taught me much about. I hear your music in them when I read. In the lights and crowd of a live concert, your music brings me concepts. Thank you for all that you do and for bearing your heart on stage.” Supporters of the film are eligible to earn a t-shirt, an eBook of the class material, the DVD of the film, a personalized essay on any Phish-philosophical subject matter, tickets to the film’s premiere, a manifesto written about your personal love of Phish, and even dinner with the professor. Jenkins explains that the money will mainly be used for production, as well as obtaining the rights to use the band within the documentary.Here’s a description of the class, for those curious:last_img read more

Pizza Party a Big Hit with 300 Homeless Men

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore“She’s earning her sainthood one slice at a time…” LeeAnn Camut organized a pizza party at St. John’s Hospice for nearly 350 homeless men. The now-annual pizza affair is much anticipated.“I wanted to feed their souls and not just their bodies,” she said. “I wanted to make them feel special.”(Read the story in Philly.com)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img

College Students Help Create Maps For Haitian Rescue Efforts

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore A group of college students is helping rescuers on the ground find their way around the wreckage in Haiti by pointing out roads and obstacles among the destruction. But they’re doing it all from the comfort of their classroom, using current satellite images and a program called “Open Street Maps.” University of Nevada Cartography students are digitizing pictures of roads and waterways, and then detailing the maps with things like collapsed buildings, road obstructions, and spontaneous camps that have sprouted up to help rescue workers in Haiti. (Continue reading in KOLO-TV) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Kids Find 20,000-Year-old Mastodon Tooth in Iowa Creek

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreFour Iowa kids exploring a cool creek found a 20,000-year-old mastodon tooth turned upside-down like a rock beneath the water.The five-pound (2.5 kilo) tooth is still attached to the huge roots.Professors say because of the good condition of the tooth, there could be even more remains from the Ice Age animal in this same creek where the tooth was found in the northeast region of the state. (WATCH the video below, or READ the story from Iowa’s WPTV)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img

In Harrison County

first_imgThere are many health care services in Harrison County for military, civilians and veterans, though implementation of the Affordable Care Act has changed established insurance options. Visit www.healthcare.gov for information on open enrollment for health care coverage under the national Affordable Care Act. Harrison County currently has one carrier that offers several different plans to its residents.See the Military Buyer’s Guide to connect with local hospitals and medical centers, health care centers and health care providers.last_img

All-City celebrates 10 year Anniversary with Limited Edition Mr. Pink & softgoods

first_imgIt’s crazy to think that All-City has been around for 10 years now. As the years have passed, their product line has steadily grown from track bikes to cross, road, gravel, and even mountain bikes. Now, in honor of their 10th birthday, All-City has whipped up a special edition Mr. Pink to commemorate the occasion. As All-City puts it, this is the most expensive paint job they’ve ever put on a bike. And depending on your opinion of splatter paint, it also may be the coolest. Each frame is hand splattered making every bike unique, and the bikes have special badging.Otherwise, the bike is the same Mr. Pink you know and love with a Columbus Zona steel frame, carbon fork, and clearance for 32mm tires or 28mm tires with fenders. Because of the increased paint cost, the 10th Anniversary Mr. Pink runs $1150 for the frameset, or $2399 for the complete with a Shimano 105 group and tubeless ready wheels. Don’t have the coin for a new bike but still want to rock the 10th Anniversary look? There’s also the 10th Anniversary cap made by Pace Sportswear, or the 10th Anniversary shirt with an illustration by Mike Jandora. You can pick up the cap for $28 or the shirt for $25.allcitycycles.comlast_img read more

Hadestown’s Eva Noblezada on Love of Sutton Foster, Teaching Herself to Cry & More on Show People

first_img3. SHE TAUGHT HERSELF HOW TO CRY ON COMMAND IN THE SHOWER“If I did it in my room with no music, my mom would have been like ‘What’s wrong with her?’ The hot water is good for your pores. You pretend the wall is your lover in the rain. Thank goodness for it because I have to cry in everything I do.” 2. GOING DOWN THE GREEK MYTHOLOGY WORMHOLE SNAKEHOLE “The beautiful thing about mythology is that it allows humans to see godlike bodies that we look up to, but the gods were created based off of humans. It’s rich in history, and [the] myths change over time, which I love. In Greek mythology, Eurydice falls into a viper’s nest. She got bit by a viper on the day of her wedding. You can really go into a wormhole—a snakehole!—it’s so interesting. I am hugely passionate about what I love to do.” Hadestown After making a triumphant (and Tony-nominated) Broadway debut as Kim in the 2017 revival of Miss Saigon, Eva Noblezada is back on the boards in Hadestown. Anaïs Mitchell’s musical, which premiered off-Broadway at New York Theatre Workshop in 2016, enjoyed a celebrated run in the West End at the National Theatre last year, with Noblezada and Reeve Carney playing the roles of lovers Eurydice and Orpheus, respectively. The young talent stopped by Show People with Paul Wontorek to discuss what’s different for her this time on the Great White Way and more. Other must-read highlights:ON HER CO-STAR REEVE CARNEY“He’s the best guy. He is incredible. I hope he never watches this because I promised him I would never compliment him. His voice could conjure the second coming of Christ. I am very, very lucky to work with him but more so just to have met him and have him in my life because he’s stuck with me now.”ON HER OBSESSION WITH SUTTON FOSTER“If Sutton Foster walked in right now, I would shit myself. Literally before we were going onstage at the Tony Awards to perform, I walked up to Sutton Foster in her beautiful gown. I started crying. Like, ‘Why can’t I speak English?’ And she was like ‘Awww, you’re so sweet.’ We took a picture. I cried. I don’t even remember what I said; I think I just made sounds at her. I’m so sorry, Sutton. I love you.”ON CHOOSING PROJECTS THAT MAKE HER PROVE HERSELF“I wanted to prove myself being in a show as big and as legendary and as epic as Miss Saigon. Hadestown is now a completely different epic in my life. Without Saigon, I would be nothing. But to walk into this–I find the story heartbreaking and inspiring but also being able to sing Anaïs’ music, think the way Rachel sees and just be this beautiful character that is timeless—that is special to me. Developing a character like this has been hugely challenging, but also the hardest thing I’ve done in my career so far for sure.”ON HER LEGENDARY CO-STAR ANDRE DE SHIELDS“Can we talk about Andre De Shields? What a legend! Andre De Shields is a walking one-man show, and he never takes a night off. Everything he says goes so far. He gives the best advice. He comes up with some things that deeply shock me—and I rarely get shocked. Also, his way of opening your eyes to things that you hadn’t really thought. He’ll say things—when he says it, it sounds so simple. Like, ‘I should have known that.’ But they’re existential: They change the meaning of life. He knows a lot about Greek mythology. He knows a lot about history.”ON PUTTING HER SPIN ON EURYDICE“In any story that I’ve seen Eurydice in, she doesn’t say anything. She literally says nothing. I’m very, very grateful that Anaïs and Rachel and everybody involved in Hadestown has been very supportive in adding a punk quality and almost half of me to the character because she is a survivor. She’s a tough girl. I wanted to make sure that she was relatable and not a mute, not a victim—especially now.”ON HER FORTHCOMING ALBUM“I am working on my album. It will not be musical theater. [The songs] will all be originals. If Jessie Ware and Amy Winehouse had a baby, that’d be me.”ON NOT MAKING A FIVE-YEAR PLAN“I don’t like making five-year plans because things change. Sometimes I wake up and go, ‘God, I wish I was in fashion.’ And then sometimes I wake up and go, ‘God, I want cake for breakfast.’ It just changes.”Watch the full episode of Show People with Paul Wontorek below! Related Shows 1. PERFORMING IN HADESTOWN FEELS “COSMIC”“Anaïs Mitchell started writing this ages ago. She is an actual goddess. I think they started out putting everybody in a van or a truck and did a tour in Vermont. It has been a long process. They did it off-Broadway at New York Theatre Workshop, and then they did it at Edmonton in Canada. I joined the journey at the National Theatre in London. I’m grateful that they even asked me to audition. I feel like a contest winner. The word that I use to describe this show, especially when it comes to the energy with the other actors, is cosmic. [Director] Rachel Chavkin is so amazing at creating this cosmic energy in a room: I feel like I’m walking amongst the stars when I do this show.” View Comments Interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.Did you know Show People is available as a podcast? Listen to your favorite stars talk Broadway and beyond on your way to work, the gym, the theater and more on iTunes and Spotify.  Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 26:02Loaded: 0%00:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently behind liveLIVERemaining Time -26:02 1xPlayback RateChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedEnglishAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Star Files from $69.00 Eva Noblezadalast_img read more

David Alan Grier on His Whirlwind Broadway Entrance & Returning to His Roots with A Soldier’s Play on Show People

first_imgHere are a few of the highlights: The 1981-1982 Broadway season was one for the ages. Stephen Sondheim and Harold Prince’s historic Broadway flop, Merrily We Roll Along, opened and closed in 12 days; a month later, Dreamgirls took its bow at the Imperial Theatre and, in February of 1982, Cher starred in her one and only Broadway credit, Come Back to the 5 & Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean. It was a busy season for Tony nominee David Alan Grier, too. While Grier is back on Broadway this season in the lead role of Charles Fuller’s A Soldier’s Play, he rushed on to the theater scene in 1981 with three whirlwind roles. He left the Yale Drama School to make his Broadway debut as Jackie Robinson in The First, opening the show in November of that year. While he earned a Tony nomination, The First closed after 37 performances. Grier moved on quickly to join the first off-Broadway production of A Soldier’s Play at the Negro Ensemble Company and, by April, took over his next project: replacing Cleavant Derricks in Dreamgirls. A role in the film adaptation of Fuller’s drama, A Soldier’s Story, would soon follow—all before his star-making turn on the TV sketch comedy show In Living Color.Grier sat down with Paul Wontorek on Show People to discuss his lightning introduction to Broadway, long career on the stage and return to the Pulitzer Prize-winning A Soldier’s Play. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 29:50Loaded: 0.55%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -29:50 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedEnglishAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Related Shows A Soldier’s Play David Alan Grier in A Soldier’s Play (Photo: Joan Marcus) On rehearsing Dreamgirls while still cast in A Soldier’s Play: “It was hard. I would rehearse all day. Then, I would perform [A Soldier’s Play] at night. They had an equity cot, which was like this yoga mat underneath a table in the stage manager’s office at [the Negro Ensemble Company’s] Theater IV where I would sleep for an hour and then get up. When I was put into [Dreamgirls], I worked with Michael Bennett and all those guys. Jennifer Holliday would cheer me on, offstage. It became another great part of my life.”On returning to A Soldier’s Play: “I was really talking with myself and the universe kind of going, ‘Oh, I’d love to go back to Broadway, but I have a young daughter. It would have to be the right production.’ You always want to be offered a role that you can’t say no to. [Director Kenny Leon] called, and he said they’re doing Soldier’s Play on Broadway. And I said, ‘Yeah, but for what role?’ I think I was looking for a way to get out of it. And he said, the Sergeant. I was like, ‘Oh man, let me think about it.’ I knew I was going to do it, but I had to think a couple of days. I called him up, and I said, ‘Listen Kenny, I don’t know.’ Kenny start cursing, he started cursing me out! And I went, ‘I’m just kidding! I’m kidding. I’m going to do it.’ Yeah, it was a bad joke.” Did you know Show People with Paul Wontorek is available as a podcast? Check it out on iTunes and Spotify. View Comments On starring in The First: “There were many days where they would teach us a new song at 10AM, run through at it 12PM and put in the show at night. Then, they’d take it out the next day and try something else. I really didn’t have a break, and I was like, ‘This is what Mickey and Judy felt like.’ My request to God, my spiritual request, after I graduated from Yale was, ‘God, please just give me one job. If you give me one job, my parents can come. Then they’ll see this wasn’t all for naught.’ Then, my prayer became ‘Let us open on Broadway.'”On his first Broadway closing: “I used to take the 104 bus down to the theater, and when it was our closing day, I took a cab. I was on 107th street, and I asked the cab driver to take me once around the park. I wanted to savor that moment because everything I asked for I had. This had been a gift. So, we’d go once around the park. You mourn in silence, in isolation. I came into the theater and everyone was crying. I just was enveloped in the sea of hugs, and it turned into an amazing day.” Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on March 15, 2020 David Alan Grier, right, as Jackie Robinson in The First. (Photo: Martha Swope/NYPL) David Alan Grierlast_img read more

Governor Shumlin announces safety improvements for Route 4 in the Hartford area

first_imgFollowing a recent increase in the number of serious motor vehicle crashes on US Route 4 in the Hartford-Woodstock area, including four fatalities in recent months, Governor Peter Shumlin today announced that the Agency of Transportation will install portable message boards reminding drivers to be alert and focus on safety, pave deteriorated stretches of the roadway surface, install centerline rumble strips in appropriate areas, conduct an engineering review to determine what further safety treatments may be warranted, and work with local officials on proposed improvements. ‘My heart goes out to the families of those injured or killed on Route 4, or any other Vermont road,’Gov. Shumlin said in an afternoon stop at the Hartford Police Department, with Senate President Pro Tem John Campbell, Rep. Alison Clarkson, AOT Deputy Secretary Sue Minter, and others. ‘We will work with communities in this area to determine what safety measures make sense for Route 4. I also remind people to drive with caution and stay alert to prevent accidents.’ ‘The lives of our citizens are at stake,’said Sen. John Campbell. ‘Our obligation is to act now.’ Gov. Shumlin and Minter met with local emergency and town officials, including Hartford Police and Fire Chief Steve Locke and Woodstock Town Manager Phil Swanson, to discuss the increase in Route 4 accidents. The Governor outlined the state’s short-term assistance, including safety signage and paving, and pledged to work with local officials and emergency staff as conversations about longer-term solutions move forward. Gov. Shumlin said it’s not clear why Route 4 has been the scene of an unusually high number of accidents this spring, but if structural changes are needed, that will be determined and work will be scheduled.‘I cannot stress enough how important it is for drivers to slow down and pay attention on this road,’Gov. Shumlin said. ‘And as we head into summer, that need for caution extends across the state.’last_img read more

DMV stops driver for 116 mph on Interstate 89

first_imgVermont Business Magazine DMV Inspector with the Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles stopped a fifty-three-year-old Vermont driver for Grossly Negligent Operation on Interstate 89 in the Town of Williston.On Wednesday afternoon, June 24, 2020, at 4:12 p.m., Colonel Jake Elovirta, Director of DMV’s Enforcement & Safety Division, was traveling northbound on I-89 French Hill near the Richmond/Williston town line. While monitoring traffic, he observed a 2002 Cobra Jet 427 replica passenger car traveling well in excess of the posted 65 mph interstate speed limit in the passing lane. Colonel Elovirta using same lane moving radar recorded a speed of 116 mph in the 65 mph interstate speed zone. The motor vehicle was stopped on I-89 in Williston.The operator was identified as Anderson S. LeVeille of Barre, Vermont. LeVeille was cited to appear at Vermont Superior Court Criminal Division in Burlington on September 3, 2020, to answer to the misdemeanor charge of Grossly Negligent Operation. The penalty for a first offense shall be imprisoned not more than two years or fined not more than $5,000.00, or both. The offense also carries a 10 point assessment on a Vermont driver’s record upon conviction. Additionally, LeVeille received a civil traffic ticket for $751.00 and 2 points for the Interstate speeding offense.From January 1st through June 22nd of this year, Vermont has had 19 fatal crashes reported. In six of those fatal crashes the operator has been suspected of speeding. With the July 4th holiday weekend fast approaching drivers are reminded to plan enough time in their travel to arrive at their destinations safely.Source: MONTPELIER – DMV 6.25.2020,Yeslast_img read more